New York State Water Environment Association:
(NYWEA)2008 Biosolids Management Innovation:

Aslan Environmental and City of Kingston Wastewater Treatment Plant, Ulster County


The City of Kingston uses an innovative system to make lawn fertilizer and fuel from its waste water sludge.

The City of Kingston partnered with the Aslan Group to develop the first system for managing wastewater treatment plant residuals in an economical and environmentally sound manner. Waste "biogas" is captured from the plant's digesters and used as the only required fuel to turn 10 wet tons per day of municipal wastewater sludge into one ton per day of an EPA-recognized, pelletized "biosolid." The biosolid is distributed free of charge for use as a lawn fertilizer or furnace fuel, which costs less than the previous practice of landfill disposal. In addition, methane gas is used within the process as a fuel. Because very little of it is flared, oxides of nitrogen and other pollutant emissions have been reduced.


New York State
Department of Environmental Conservation:

Aslan Environmental & City of Kingston WWTP, Ulster County
Project Name:
Innovative Automated Process for Creating "Class A" Biosolids at Small and Medium Municipalities

Project Description:
The City of Kingston, NY, partnered the Aslan Group and succeeded in developing a new and innovative system for managing wastewater treatment plant solids residuals in an economical and environmentally sound manner.
The first system of its kind in the world has successfully been in operation at the Kingston Wastewater Treatment Plant for just over one year. Waste biogas is captured from the plant's digesters and utilized as the only required fuel to turn 10 wet tons per day of municipal wastewater sludge into one ton per day of an EPA recognized "Class A" EQ pelletized usable biosolid. The biosolid is distributed free of charge for use as a lawn fertilizer or furnace fuel. This is accomplished at a cost to the City of Kingston less than the previous cost of discarding "Class B" sludge at a New York State landfill.

Methane gas is efficiently utilized within the process as a fuel and since very little methane is flared any longer, NOx and other pollutant emissions have been reduced. In addition, landfill space is saved, leachate is no longer produced, truck traffic is minimized, local plant odors are reduced, 500-mile trucking trips have ceased, and the system operates fully automatically at nearly zero energy cost.

The drying technology selected was previously proven in large scale dryers in Brugges and Antwerp, Belgium, and in Baltimore, Maryland. With Kingston's assistance, Aslan initiated an energy evaluation of the overall plant operations and integrated this solution to the existing plant. The entire system then needed to be scaled down to meet the needs of the smaller Kingston operation. The operating system also needed to be updated to allow for automated operations. Over the past year, the plant has hosted many tours of the new operational model. Measurable environmental benefits of this innovative project include:

Removing a 6-8 ft. high flare burning methane, sulfur and mercaptin compounds. Biogas is now burned in a furnace and used as a heat source for the drying process;
Reducing tens of thousands of yards or tons of "Class B" waste solids from being landfilled annually;
Reducing truck traffic by 30 trips per year;
Distributing biosolids, free of charge, to golf courses, landscapers and excavators. Residents are also able to pick up the product free of charge.